Resilience in science and technology are key topics, particularly when we want to address the issue of Climate Change adaptation (CCA).

Resilience in the ecology of communities and ecosystems

The capacity of resilience of an ecosystem is directly related with the richness of species and the transference of ecological functions that this has. In other words, the system in which its integrants have more diversity and number of ecological functions will be able to face a specific disturbance in a better way.

Ecologic Resilience

In ecology of communities and ecosystems, the term resilience indicates their capacity of absorbing disturbances, without significantly altering its characteristics of structure and functionality, meaning, they would be able to go back to its original state once the disturbance has ended. In that sense, we can observe that communities with more complex ecosystems (that have a vast number of interactions among its parts), have usually major resiliencies for there are a bigger quantity of self regulation mechanisms.

The capacity of resilience of an ecosystem is directly related with the richness of species and the superposition of ecological functions that these have. Meaning that a system in which its integrants have more diversity and number of ecological functions will be able to face in a better way a specific disturbance.

Resilience is defined as the capacity of a system to return to the previous conditions to the disruption (Fox and Fox, 1986; Pimm, 1984; Keeley, 1986). To calculate it in a determinate time period one calculates the quotient between the measures before and after the disturbance of any descriptive variable of the ecosystem (Tilman and Downing, 1994).

Source: Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Resilience_%28ecology%29

Adaptability, vulnerability and resilience in complex social- ecological systems: sustainability depends upon… the dynamic quality of maintaining adaptable capacity and opportunities… [Because] the real world is full of surprises or disturbances and long term structural transformations… New instruments and concepts are necessary to understand complex adaptable systems transitions. A concrete example of that is Climate Change Adaptation.  These highlight the importance of disturbance, diversity, and novelty in the determination of resilience, and thus sustainability of ecosystems and its joint human enterprises. "Such knowledge has to be directed to the fixation of particular social- economical systems- and their adaptable capacity- within bigger regional and global contexts”.  This topic has also being identified as deserving the highest priority in a separate report of the ICSU rainbow series, using the extended work of the Resilience Alliance.

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Field Guide

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